USING SOCIAL FORCES AND NUDGES TO INFLUENCE GIVING

PROJECT SUMMARY

Cascaid is a custom charitable giving plan platform where people can make and manage recurring donations to their favorite causes. Their goal is to make donating as easy as liking friends’ posts, retweeting the day’s headlines, or sharing favorite playlists.

WHAT I DID

  • Content Audit
  • User Research
  • UX Writing & Design

TIMELINE

4 weeks start to finish including 1 week testing of language, tone, and statements.

INTERESTING FACT

33% of survey respondents couldn’t remember all the organizations they donated to in the last year

Cascaid website
 

HOW CAN WE ENCOURAGE RECURRING MONTHLY CHARITABLE GIVING?

“Donating is inspiring: to see a group of people come together to do something good. I want to contribute to that, even a small amount. It feels good to indirectly help an organization to do something better and to support other people.”
—Quote from interview respondent.

WHAT I DID

My goal was to explore the premise that people feel better spending money on others than on themselves.

I started with a Content Audit of cascaid.io to understand their overall information architecture and goals.

I then conducted a survey and some very inspiring and uplifting user interviews to uncover the motivations, frustrations, and situations surrounding charitable giving.

All of the findings went into creating a more efficient donation form that would be ready for social sharing.
 

THE PROCESS

Forms are one of the most important ways users interact with a service. They are used everywhere—for sign up, subscriptions, customer feedback, checkout, or as data input to search for or share information. One of Cascaid’s main goals is to make it easy to share your donation plan to increase your impact. Can a well-designed form make donating less overwhelming and increase social sharing?



CONTENT AUDIT


Cascaid relies on user-generated data and needs a way to reliably sort and display different causes for people to discover. I performed a content audit and taxonomy exercise to create the sitemap and categories.


USER RESEARCH


My main research goal was to find out if knowing the impact of your donation influences giving. Is it important to be recognized or thanked for the donation? I conducted a qualitative survey and 8 user interviews.


UX WRITING & DESIGN


I chose to base the user experience around Choice Architecture. Setting up a new cause to donate to can be overwhelming and complex. By influencing the decision-making and simplifying the presentation of options, my goal was to make it easy to donate and have users feel like they are making a difference.

 

HOW TO DRAW INSIGHTS FROM THE CURRENT CONTENT

Since Cascaid relies on user-generated data, they need a way to reliably sort and display different causes so that new users can discover them. I performed a content audit on the existing Cascaid site to create the sitemap and a taxonomy exercise on competitors like GoFundMe and Kickstarter to establish a set of categories for causes created on Cascaid.

THE CONTENT AUDIT

When you’re redesigning an existing site it is always worth taking time to audit the current content. I used GatherContent’s template and Content Audit Playbook for this process.
Snapshot of the content audit spreadsheet.

Content Audit Cascaid
 

USER RESEARCH

SURVEY FINDINGS

  • 50% of people give once a month or once every three months.
  • 33% of people give because they have a strong belief in a cause, followed by donating because it’s the right thing to do (26%) and to change someone’s life (23%)
  • 80% of people said it is important for people to know that the charity is genuine before donating.
  • 46% would like to spread their donations across several charities.
  • 33% of people can’t remember which organizations they donated to in the last year.

FINDING A TESTABLE HYPOTHESIS

Based on the survey, I decided to test the hypothesis that there is a need for a single place to give, verify charities, and track the impact of a donation by interviewing five people who donate at least 6–12 times per year. I also wanted to understand their motivations for giving.

Interview Quotes

Interview Quotes Cascaid
 

USING THE “JOBS TO BE DONE” FRAMEWORK

Using the survey and user interviews as a base, I created Job Stories (JTBD) with the goal to create a framework to test the new content and design against.

These stories became the basis for Cascaid’s priorities and a structure for the user experience, brand voice, and content.

Jobs To Be Done Stories

JTBD Cscaid
 

UX WRITING & DESIGN

I decided to focus on creating a form that would allow for Cascaid to capture more data about the causes such as a category, verified charities, impact score for the charity. I would also use images sourced from Unsplash to create a visual appeal without burdening the user with uploading an image themselves.

WORKING WITH THE FORM STRUCTURE

A form is a conversation. And like any conversation, it should feel like a natural and logical communication between two parties—the user and the product.
Before
Cascaid old form
After
Cascaid new form
 

CREATING THE CONVERSATIOIN

Ask only for what you need

Inform the user why Cascaid is asking for the information, how it will be used, and the benefit it has to them.

create cause filled

Follow a logical order

The information Cascaid asks for should be what the user expects to give. The form asks for details about the cause and why the user cares about it before asking for the payment method.

payment method cascaid

Group related information

For Cascaid, I decided to do a form with multiple steps where each group of fields is separated by a step. This way, the flow resembles a conversation and doesn’t overwhelm the user.

select category cascaid
 

INTERACTIVE PROTOTYPE

Try out the prototype by clicking in the image below.

 

FULL CASE STUDY

I wrote a full case study on this project on Prototypr to explain my research and approach to Choice Architecture.

READ ON MEDIUM